Culture

“Potential Inertia” Gets Final Trailer

Official Web Log Of Matt Croyle - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 7:39pm

(OIL CITY, PA) One Fish Films released the final trailer for Matt Croyle’s upcoming directorial debut, Potential Inertia. The film can be pre-ordered at: http://potentialinertia.weebly.com


Incredible Bride and Groom First Dance

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 5:40pm
Check out this incredible Bride & Groom First Dance that took place at the Robert M. Smith Student Center at Slippery Rock University this past Saturday. Stephanie and Ryan asked that we have all of the guests surround the dance floor just prior to introducing the bridal party into the ballroom. Then, once we formally introduced the bridal […]

Stephanie and Ryan’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 10:54am
On Saturday November 15, 2014 we were at the Robert M. Smith Student Center which is located inside Slippery Rock University. The Event was a wedding reception for Stephanie and Ryan. Stephanie and Ryan booked our Deluxe Entertainment Package which includes whole-room up-lighting. Stephanie and Ryan chose a purple color to be displayed during cocktails and […]

Why I don’t understand feminism

Xaotik Designs - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 10:00am

Recently, a man landed a space craft on an asteroid and all feminists care about is the shirt he had on. Never mind the fact that the shirt was made by a female friend of his, with cloth whose pattern is also sold by a woman. It would appear that these two women are really […]

The post Why I don’t understand feminism appeared first on Xaotik Designs Industries.

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Ashley and Andrew’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Tue, 11/11/2014 - 10:00am
On Saturday November 08, 2014 we were back at our favorite banquet hall, The White Barn in Prospect Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding ceremony and wedding reception for Ashley and Andrew. Ashley and Andrew booked out Deluxe Entertainment Package which includes up-lighting. Ashley and Andrew chose golden amber as a static color that we displayed during […]

Directing Your Actors For A Believable Performance – By Matt Croyle

Official Web Log Of Matt Croyle - Tue, 11/04/2014 - 2:35pm

Me directing my cast of veteran and rookie actors on set of ‘Potential Inertia’

With 99.95% of my first feature shot, I thought I would give some personal tips on how to actually get believable performances from your actors. And while this may sound like a pretty simple task — “Just say the lines.” or “Give me a bit more sadness behind it.” —  it definitely is not a simple thing at all. I will explain why it isn’t so simple, and then I will give you some tricks I, myself, was able to use on my feature, ‘Potential Inertia’.

SUBJECTIVITY & PERCEPTION

As a director, you have to ask yourself: “What is believable and what isn’t?” The answer is: It’s subjective. I think one has to truly grasp what kind of film they are actually making. Is it a comedy? Is it a drama? All types of films require all types of acting — “styles” if you will. However, regardless of genre, even if it’s an “over-the-top” comedy, all performances must be believable to an audience if the audience is going to be willing to come along with you for a ride.

What is “real” actually starts with the writer. It is how the writer writes the characters themselves. What is real in the world of the character may not necessarily be real to the audience.

For example: In ‘Dumb and Dumber’, Harry and Lloyd are not very realistic characters to an audience. They’re portrayed as cartoonish embellishments of what low intelligence would be — brilliant comedic acting by Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, but they seem not very plausible in real-life. However, every other character in the film is just like you and me. These are not only choices by the writer, for writing such fantastic lines, but also the direction that has been given to every actor on set. The normality of the supporting characters embellishes, even more, the absurdity in the direction that was given to Carrey and Daniels — and we’re willing to “believe” them as being “real” because the reality is subjective to the characters themselves.

The actor must make choices — or have those choices made for them — that would best interpret how that character would physically react or vocalize given a specific situation(s). The director’s job is to make sure their vision of said situation(s) translates to an audience in the most realistic way possible. If the audience can’t connect, or buy into the reality of what they are seeing, then it’s ultimately the director’s fault.

THE EXPERIENCE FACTOR

So, how exactly does one go about getting their actors to pull off this remarkable feat of morphing themselves into what you want and need from them? How do you get your actors to be “real”? How do you get your actors to be “believable”?

Every actor is a different monster, and I say ‘Monster’ in a very loving way. I’m also an actor, so I know what it feels like to be molded, scorned, twisted, praised, rewarded, and the plethora of feelings that come with the job. But, as a director I must realize that each person I’m directing is different. Each has different experience. Each has a different process they use to get into character.

In my first feature film, ‘Potential Inertia’, the experience of my actors runs the gamut. I have had to direct people who have been leads in previous independent features, people who have been background and supporting roles in major Hollywood movies, and people who have had no acting experience in their entire lives.

My actors with experience on stage, screen, or both, all have their own processes. For those folks, it was imperative that I made clear what kind of film this was to be — the tone, the level of intensity or urgency for each scene, and the fact that I didn’t want their lines to sound inelastic. And with those experienced folks I was able to allow a level of trust that veteran actors deserve, because they are the ones that can understand the structure of a scene. They are the one’s who you really need to mentor those lacking the time spent in front of an audience.  Regardless, each of those actors have individual processes, and as a director it is my responsibility, again, to understand each process by itself, be able to explain what I want to coincide with each process, and be able to find a cohesive way to mesh each actor together with another.

THE ROOKIES

It can be extremely fun or totally frustrating to direct an actor who has never been in front of a camera before. They are extremely aware of the camera itself. They are not sure of themselves, or what to expect from a more experienced actor they have to do a scene with. It is a real test to put someone on screen who hasn’t the slightest clue of what they are doing.

I have knack at “seeing” people. I mean, really seeing who they are. Not all extroverts make good actors. Not all introverts can’t be actors. However, all “passionate” people can. I believe putting someone who is a passionate person in front of the camera for their first role will be a better idea than putting someone there who isn’t one.

DIRECTING NOTES

The following notes are a bit of advice I have for those directors trying to get believable performances from their actors. These notes are a direct result of trying to make my first feature film as conversationally believable as possible using both veteran and rookie actors. I hope you all find them useful.

  • Always remember that every actor has a different process, especially those veterans you have in your cast.
  • Let the words in the script work for you, and not against you. If you need to give an actor a line reading, especially the rookies, do not be afraid to do so in the most polite manner possible. Let your actors play, but if they’re not giving you the delivery you want, make sure you show them what you need.
  • Make sure your actors understand what each scene is about, and what is happening both on the surface and underneath it. Scene study with your actors can be a valuable tool when your actors are making decisions while the camera is rolling. If they don’t know why they’re saying something, if they don’t know their motivation, then there will be no focus or purpose in the delivery of their dialogue.
  • Remind your actors to BREATHE. Breathing is imperative to coming across as believable. People breathe when they speak.
  • Remind your actors to NOT RUSH their lines (unless rushing their lines is a character trait, or the scene calls for it).
  • Let your actors veer slightly off script, perhaps to say their lines in their own way. Unless a specific line MUST be included in the story fully intact, sometimes letting your actors take a more personal approach to delivering them results in a more conversational result.
  • Prepare them for the intensity or lack thereof in each scene.

I think it is important as a director to remember that each set is different, along with each script, and one must always take those two factors into consideration when looking at what is ‘real’ and ‘believable’. Please remember that your actors are an extension of you, and your vision, for what the film will ultimately be. Work WITH them, have fun WITH them, and communicate WITH them.

COPYRIGHT (C) 2014 MATT CROYLE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Directing Your Actors For A Believable Performance – By Matt Croyle

Official Web Log Of Matt Croyle - Tue, 11/04/2014 - 2:35pm

Me directing my cast of veteran and rookie actors on set of ‘Potential Inertia’

With 99.95% of my first feature shot, I thought I would give some personal tips on how to actually get believable performances from your actors. And while this may sound like a pretty simple task — “Just say the lines.” or “Give me a bit more sadness behind it.” —  it definitely is not a simple thing at all. I will explain why it isn’t so simple, and then I will give you some tricks I, myself, was able to use on my feature, ‘Potential Inertia’.

SUBJECTIVITY & PERCEPTION

As a director, you have to ask yourself: “What is believable and what isn’t?” The answer is: It’s subjective. I think one has to truly grasp what kind of film they are actually making. Is it a comedy? Is it a drama? All types of films require all types of acting — “styles” if you will. However, regardless of genre, even if it’s an “over-the-top” comedy, all performances must be believable to an audience if the audience is going to be willing to come along with you for a ride.

What is “real” actually starts with the writer. It is how the writer writes the characters themselves. What is real in the world of the character may not necessarily be real to the audience.

For example: In ‘Dumb and Dumber’, Harry and Lloyd are not very realistic characters to an audience. They’re portrayed as cartoonish embellishments of what low intelligence would be — brilliant comedic acting by Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, but they seem not very plausible in real-life. However, every other character in the film is just like you and me. These are not only choices by the writer, for writing such fantastic lines, but also the direction that has been given to every actor on set. The normality of the supporting characters embellishes, even more, the absurdity in the direction that was given to Carrey and Daniels — and we’re willing to “believe” them as being “real” because the reality is subjective to the characters themselves.

The actor must make choices — or have those choices made for them — that would best interpret how that character would physically react or vocalize given a specific situation(s). The director’s job is to make sure their vision of said situation(s) translates to an audience in the most realistic way possible. If the audience can’t connect, or buy into the reality of what they are seeing, then it’s ultimately the director’s fault.

THE EXPERIENCE FACTOR

So, how exactly does one go about getting their actors to pull off this remarkable feat of morphing themselves into what you want and need from them? How do you get your actors to be “real”? How do you get your actors to be “believable”?

Every actor is a different monster, and I say ‘Monster’ in a very loving way. I’m also an actor, so I know what it feels like to be molded, scorned, twisted, praised, rewarded, and the plethora of feelings that come with the job. But, as a director I must realize that each person I’m directing is different. Each has different experience. Each has a different process they use to get into character.

In my first feature film, ‘Potential Inertia’, the experience of my actors runs the gamut. I have had to direct people who have been leads in previous independent features, people who have been background and supporting roles in major Hollywood movies, and people who have had no acting experience in their entire lives.

My actors with experience on stage, screen, or both, all have their own processes. For those folks, it was imperative that I made clear what kind of film this was to be — the tone, the level of intensity or urgency for each scene, and the fact that I didn’t want their lines to sound inelastic. And with those experienced folks I was able to allow a level of trust that veteran actors deserve, because they are the ones that can understand the structure of a scene. They are the one’s who you really need to mentor those lacking the time spent in front of an audience.  Regardless, each of those actors have individual processes, and as a director it is my responsibility, again, to understand each process by itself, be able to explain what I want to coincide with each process, and be able to find a cohesive way to mesh each actor together with another.

THE ROOKIES

It can be extremely fun or totally frustrating to direct an actor who has never been in front of a camera before. They are extremely aware of the camera itself. They are not sure of themselves, or what to expect from a more experienced actor they have to do a scene with. It is a real test to put someone on screen who hasn’t the slightest clue of what they are doing.

I have knack at “seeing” people. I mean, really seeing who they are. Not all extroverts make good actors. Not all introverts can’t be actors. However, all “passionate” people can. I believe putting someone who is a passionate person in front of the camera for their first role will be a better idea than putting someone there who isn’t one.

DIRECTING NOTES

The following notes are a bit of advice I have for those directors trying to get believable performances from their actors. These notes are a direct result of trying to make my first feature film as conversationally believable as possible using both veteran and rookie actors. I hope you all find them useful.

  • Always remember that every actor has a different process, especially those veterans you have in your cast.
  • Let the words in the script work for you, and not against you. If you need to give an actor a line reading, especially the rookies, do not be afraid to do so in the most polite manner possible. Let your actors play, but if they’re not giving you the delivery you want, make sure you show them what you need.
  • Make sure your actors understand what each scene is about, and what is happening both on the surface and underneath it. Scene study with your actors can be a valuable tool when your actors are making decisions while the camera is rolling. If they don’t know why they’re saying something, if they don’t know their motivation, then there will be no focus or purpose in the delivery of their dialogue.
  • Remind your actors to BREATHE. Breathing is imperative to coming across as believable. People breathe when they speak.
  • Remind your actors to NOT RUSH their lines (unless rushing their lines is a character trait, or the scene calls for it).
  • Let your actors veer slightly off script, perhaps to say their lines in their own way. Unless a specific line MUST be included in the story fully intact, sometimes letting your actors take a more personal approach to delivering them results in a more conversational result.
  • Prepare them for the intensity or lack thereof in each scene.

I think it is important as a director to remember that each set is different, along with each script, and one must always take those two factors into consideration when looking at what is ‘real’ and ‘believable’. Please remember that your actors are an extension of you, and your vision, for what the film will ultimately be. Work WITH them, have fun WITH them, and communicate WITH them.

COPYRIGHT (C) 2014 MATT CROYLE. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Jessica and Adam’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Mon, 11/03/2014 - 2:08pm
On Saturday November 01, 2014 we were at The Alpine Room which is located within the SNPJ Recreation Center in Enon Valley Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Jessica and Adam. Jessica and Adam booked our Deluxe Entertainment Package which includes up-Lighting. They chose a medium purple color to be displayed during the cocktail […]

Happy Halloween

Xaotik Designs - Fri, 10/31/2014 - 4:51pm

The post Happy Halloween appeared first on Xaotik Designs Industries.

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Best Matron of Honor Toast Ever – Another One Bites The Dust

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 10:49am
Check out the video below of the awesome Matron of Honor Toast that Gabrielle sang at her sister Jordan’s wedding reception. Gabrielle contacted me prior to the wedding and indicated that she wanted to sing her upcoming toast. So, I worked with her to obtain a karaoke version of Queen’s Another One Bites The Dust and Gabrielle wrote some clever […]

Jordan and Matthew’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 1:58am
On Friday October 24, 2014 we were at The Terrace Room which is located inside of The Butler Days Inn in Butler Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Jordan and Matthew. Jordan and Matt were married at 4:30 pm at Camp Lutherlyn in Butler. Guests began arriving at The Terrace Room at 6:00 […]

Stella and Eric’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 10:36pm
On Saturday October 18, 2014 we were at The Terrace Room which is located inside of the Days Inn in Butler Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Stella and Eric. Stella and Eric were married at 3:30 pm at St. Michael’s Church in Butler PA. Guests began arriving at The Terrace Room at […]

Lucy and Gene’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Wed, 10/15/2014 - 12:55am
On Saturday October 11, 2014 we were at Five Fillies Farm in New Wilmington Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Lucy and Gene. Lucy and Gene were married at 3:30 pm at the United Methodist Church in Ellwood City PA. Guests began arriving at Five Fillies Farm at 5:00 pm as they enjoyed […]

Brandi and Justin’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 8:39am
On Friday October 10, 2014 we were at The White Barn in Prospect Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Brandi and Justin. Brandi and Justin were married at 3:30 pm at Trinity Lutheran Church in Ellwood City. Guest began arriving at The White Barn at 4:30 pm where they enjoyed cocktails and appetizers […]

Universal’s Shared Monster Universe

Xaotik Designs - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 9:00am

  Universal has stated that they want to make a “Shared Universe” for their monsters.  This could be a good thing, or a very bad thing.  I really hope that they do not try to make some kind of Avengers style team up movie.  I think we remember the last time a movie like that […]

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Amanda and Curtis’ Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 7:20pm
On Sunday October 05, 2014 we were back at our favorite banquet hall, The White Barn in Prospect Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding ceremony and wedding reception for Amanda and Curtis. Amanda and Curtis were married in front of the pond, at the rear of The White Barn. Guests began arriving at The White Barn at […]

Stephanie and Rob’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 1:05am
On Saturday October 04, 2014 we were at The Fez in Hopewell Township, Aliquippa Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding reception for Stephanie and Rob. Stephanie and Rob booked our Deluxe Entertainment Package which includes up-lighting. The couple chose a golden amber color to be displayed during cocktails and dinner and they opted to have the up-lights […]

Kara and Corry’s Wedding

Pifemaster Productions Disc Jockey - Tue, 10/07/2014 - 9:10am
On Friday October 03, 2014 we were at Succop Conservancy in Butler Pennsylvania. The event was a wedding ceremony and wedding reception for Kara and Corry. Kara and Corry were originally planning on getting married in front of the MarCraig House at Succop Conservancy. However due the uncooperative weather, a last minute decision was made to […]

One Fish Films Launches Pre-Orders of Matt Croyle’s Potential Inertia

Official Web Log Of Matt Croyle - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 8:36am

(OIL CITY, PA) – One Fish Films has made pre-orders available for the upcoming release of the feature film ‘POTENTIAL INERTA’ written and directed by its creative director Matt Croyle.

‘Potential Inertia’, and its award-nominated screenplay, tells the story of Declan Holmes, a graduating college senior who experiences loss he is not quite ready for, in a time of transition and in need of support from those who care about him the most. This coming-of-age tale is Croyle’s feature directorial debut.

Pre-orders for the film can be purchased at: http://potentialinertia.weebly.com for a discounted price of $9.99 if you buy the film before the upcoming release date.

The film stars Matthew King, and will be widely released on digital VOD in late 2014.

For more information about the film, please visit its official facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/potentialinertia


One Fish Films Launches Pre-Orders of Matt Croyle’s Potential Inertia

Official Web Log Of Matt Croyle - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 8:36am

(OIL CITY, PA) – One Fish Films has made pre-orders available for the upcoming release of the feature film ‘POTENTIAL INERTA’ written and directed by its creative director Matt Croyle.

‘Potential Inertia’, and its award-nominated screenplay, tells the story of Declan Holmes, a graduating college senior who experiences loss he is not quite ready for, in a time of transition and in need of support from those who care about him the most. This coming-of-age tale is Croyle’s feature directorial debut.

Pre-orders for the film can be purchased at: http://potentialinertia.weebly.com for a discounted price of $9.99 if you buy the film before the upcoming release date.

The film stars Matthew King, and will be widely released on digital VOD in late 2014.

For more information about the film, please visit its official facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/potentialinertia


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